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After Nikola Tesla Proved Wireless Electricity Was Possible, A Startup Finally Made It A Reality

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After Nikola Tesla Proved Wireless Electricity Was Possible, A Startup Finally Made It A Reality
Photo Credit: Getty

Matt Agorist, The Free Thought Project

Nikola Tesla is not the subject of American social studies or science classes. American children do not learn about him in school and this is in spite of the fact that he is considered one of the most influential scientists ever. His visions were motivated by altruism and providing a benefit to all of humanity, not just those who can afford it. One of the ways Tesla envisioned helping the world was providing it with extremely low-cost, or even free, electricity. But with the cost of wires running across continents, this was a futile task. So, Tesla thought outside of the box — getting the wires out of the picture entirely.

Now, his vision is finally coming to fruition.

In 1901 Tesla began his work of a large high-voltage wireless energy transmission station called the Wardenclyffe Tower which was a wireless prototype transmitter for a “World Wireless System” that was to broadcast both information and power worldwide. Over a century ago, Tesla even demonstrated that his technology worked to investors, but they pulled out and the facility was never completed. Establishment science then told the world that his inventions would never work.

But they were wrong.

Fast-forward to 2020 and a startup company named Emrod says it has figured it out.

As Popular Mechanics reports, in a statement, Emrod founder Greg Kushnir says he was motivated by New Zealand’s particular set of skills, à la Liam Neeson in Taken.

“We have an abundance of clean hydro, solar, and wind energy available around the world but there are costly challenges that come with delivering that energy using traditional methods, for example, offshore wind farms or the Cook Strait here in New Zealand requiring underwater cables which are expensive to install and maintain.”

By removing the requirement for electricity to travel through wire, Emrod can fulfill Tesla’s desire to bring energy to those who cannot afford the infrastructure or those who live in difficult terrain.

There are also environmental benefits to the technology as many places uses diesel generators or other fossil fuels to relay electricity from place to place. Emrod’s technology will remove the need for these stations.

“Energy is transmitted through electromagnetic waves over long distances using Emrod’s proprietary beam shaping, metamaterials and rectenna technology,” Emrod explains.

It is safer too.

Emrod uses beams in the ISM (Industrial, Scientific, and Medical) band with frequencies commonly used in WiFi, Bluetooth, and RfID.

Point-to-Point transmission means that power is beamed directly between two points. There is no radiation around the beam, as there is with high voltage wire transmission.

Low power laser safety curtain ensures that the transmission beam immediately shuts down before any transient object (such as a bird or helicopter) can reach the main beam ensuring it never touches anything except clean air.

As PM notes, technology like this would seem implausible because of issues like the loss of signal fidelity over the transmission through the air then through a series of mediating technologies. But Emrod’s relay technology, which it says “refocuses the beam,” doesn’t use any power, and loses almost none.

Kushnir tells New Atlas:

“The efficiency of all the components we’ve developed are pretty good, close to 100%. Most of the loss is on the transmitting side. We’re using solid state for the transmitting side, and that’s essentially the same electronic elements you can find in any radar system, or even your microwave at home. Those are at the moment limited to around 70% efficiency. But there’s a lot of development going into it, mainly driven by communications, 5G and so on.”

Kushnir says that the original setup will be fairly low, sending a few kilowatts over a few kilometres. However, he says that scaling up in order to send “unfathomable” amounts of energy over longer distances can be done, hypothetically, by making larger rectennas.

While every generation is astonished by the advancement of technology, few generations have predicted technological advancements so far before they happened, and the accuracy with which Tesla did it is mind boggling.

Imagine the world today if Tesla’s visions were allowed to come to fruition had his work not been seized by the government. Sadly, however, that was not the case.

Only two days after his death, the FBI ordered the U.S. Office of Alien Property to seize all of Tesla’s belongings. Tesla’s entire estate from the Hotel New Yorker, and other New York City hotels, was transported to the Manhattan Storage and Warehouse Company under OAP seal.

In an instant, this genius man’s entire life’s work became the property of the government to further their militaristic escapades.

However, not all was lost; as TFTP reported, several new geniuses would rise up and follow in Tesla’s footsteps. People like Jim Murray would diligently devote their lives to understanding this great man, and in turn, create paradigm shifting technologies like the SERPS (Switched Energy Resonance Power Supply) device.

This highly specialized electronic circuit has the ability to “Magnify” the effective power applied to it by nearly 50 times. When Jim coupled his device with his friend Paul Babcock’s patented ultrafast five nanosecond switching technology, they achieved a 4790% increase in electrical power compared to the input. This type of performance, if commercialized, would cause the largest electric utility companies to shake in their boots.

It’s been nearly 8 decades since his death, and through companies like Emron, Tesla is still helping to make the world a better place — in spite of government schools making no mention of his contributions to humanity.

The views in this article may not reflect editorial policy of Collective Spark.

About the Author

Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on TwitterSteemit, and now on Minds.

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Innovation

BMW Develops Turbocharged Electric Wingsuit That Lets You Fly At 186 Mph

BMW is hoping that it can revolutionize extreme sports by turbocharging wingsuits to reach blazing speeds of up to 186 miles per hour.

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BMW Develops Turbocharged Electric Wingsuit That Lets You Fly At 186 Mph
Photo Credit: BMW

(TMU) German automotive giant BMW is hoping that it can revolutionize extreme sports by turbocharging wingsuits to reach blazing speeds of up to 186 miles per hour (300-km/h).

Conventional wingsuit flying began as an extreme sport in the late 90s, with humans wearing the flying squirrel-like suits – also known as birdman suits and bat suits –to glide as they fell from enormous heights to navigate narrow canyons, caves, and gorges.

Since then, wingsuit flying has proved its staying power and become a veritable genre of its own on YouTube, with dozens of videos sponsored by the likes of GoPro and Red Bull showing the exploits of daring wingsuit flyers who use gravity to reach blistering speeds.

However, engineers at BMW’s Designworks studio have now created a wingsuit that would be equipped with a set of electric impellers that pump out 20 horsepower, allowing wearers to reach speeds that were previously unthinkable, reports New Atlas.

The experimental wingsuit is the brainchild of Peter Salzmann, an Austrian stuntman who linked up with the German carmaker to push the extreme sport past the limits.

The final result is this wingsuit fitted with chest-mounted, electric-powered contraption with two 25,000 rpm, 5-inch impellers.

Salzmann is a seasoned wingsuit flyer whose top speed can reach a formidable 62 mph. However, after some time the extreme sport seems less like actual flying and more like prolonged, albeit extreme, falling.

But with this new BMW propulsion system that reaches 186 mph, your typical wingsuit flyer can feel less like a flying squirrel and more like a rising eagle who can actually regain altitude – at least for as long as the suit’s electrical charge lasts.

This speed demon’s dream device has been tested in specialized wind tunnels and has been used in 30 different test jumps. In a video showing the wingsuit’s first public demonstration, an airborne Salzmann can be seen soaring past the Del Brüder mountain peaks of the Austrian Alps.

In the video, the seasoned stuntman and two other stuntmen wearing normal, analog wingsuits can be seen jumping out of a helicopter at 10,000 feet. They soon begin to fly in formation before Salzmann breaks from them and flies over a mountain peak. Meanwhile, his mates in unpowered wingsuits are forced to fly around it.

“In a relaxed atmosphere one evening after a day of testing, we threw out lots of ideas about how we could improve performance,” Salzmann said in a press release“One of them was a supporting motor – and it’s an idea I just couldn’t shake. I found the idea of being able to jump from my local mountain wearing the wingsuit and land in my garden fascinating.”

It still remains unclear whether BMW plans to go beyond releasing that one epic video, and plans to release these turbocharged wingsuits to consumers. So far, this wild invention seems to be a component in a promotional campaign for its new electric SUV, the iX3.

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It’s Finally Happening: Japan May Have Flying Cars In Three Years

A Japanese tech startup, the Tokyo-based company SkyDrive, now says it plans to launch the first commercial flying car taxi service by 2023.

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It’s Finally Happening: Japan May Have Flying Cars In Three Years
Photo Credit: TMU

(TMU) – Popularized most memorably by an air-borne DeLorean in Back to the Future 2, the vision of flying cars has been a persistent science fiction trope for many decades. However, the technological challenges and complications of social implementation have largely rendered the idea a no-go.

A Japanese tech startup, the Tokyo-based company SkyDrive, now says it plans to launch the first commercial flying taxi service by 2023. The company’s CEO Tomohiro Fukuzawa goes further and even predicts that by the 2040s, there will be a trillion-dollar global market for electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft (eVTOL).

According to Rajeev Lalwani, Morgan Stanley’s aircraft analyst, this market “could likely begin as an ultra-niche add-on to existing transportation infrastructure, similar to how helicopters operate today. They could later transform into a cost-effective, time-efficient method of traveling short to medium distances, eventually taking business away from car and airline companies.”

SkyDrive is one of over 100 flying car initiatives around the world – a race that includes Boeing Co., Airbus SE and Uber Technologies Inc. – but its plan is for a small two-seat vehicle with eVTOLs propellers in all four corners of the upper half of the craft, a design which Fukuzawa believes will enhance its safety. This battery-powered SD-x model would have a travel range of dozens of kilometres at 100 kmh (62 mph).

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

While there are still many sceptics who are cynical that these cars will ever get off the ground (so to speak), Fukuzawa imagines offering a flying taxi service to big cities in Japan, starting in the Osaka Bay area and slowly branching out. By 2050, he believes Japanese citizens will be able to take an air taxi to “any destination within the capital’s 23 wards in 10 minutes.”

“The two biggest difficulties,” he said in a recent interview“are getting it certified for commercial flights and ensuring the same safety and reliability as existing aircraft — and changing the social climate, by letting the general public know about this air mobility, and making them want to ride a flying car.”

If and when these hurdles are overcome, the air taxi (with the ability to vertically take-off and land) could revolutionize the travel industry, reducing traffic congestion in cities, assisting citizens during natural disasters, and increasing access to remote locations.

“The initial model will fly basically on autopilot, but it’s not 100% autonomous because a pilot would need to manoeuvre it in case of an emergency, for example,” Fukuzawa says.

With drones increasingly commercialized and self-driving cars poised to soon dominate the marketplace, one can imagine a drastically different cityscape in the near future that more closely approximates science fiction movies. While there are legitimate questions about the viability of Japan’s air taxi industry – much less whether that market can spread around the world – the ‘flying car’ prototype is certainly a marvellous technology to behold.

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Elon Musk: We Are One Year Away From Fully Autonomous, Self-Driving Cars

Elon Musk says we are essentially within a year of fully autonomous cars being a reality.

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Elon Musk: We Are One Year Away From Fully Autonomous, Self-Driving Cars
Photo Credit: TMU

(TMU) – Would you entrust your life to a car’s algorithmic intelligence? Would you curl up in the backseat and take a nap while your vehicle navigates hectic freeway traffic or busy intersections? Would you let your car be the designated driver while you have a night out on the town?

According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, we are essentially within a year of such technology existing, though he adds the caveat that it will likely take longer before the system is fully deployed and adopted.

Earlier this month, Musk announced the advance at the World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai. He has since elaborated during several podcast interviews.

To Cathie Wood and Tasha Keeney of ARK Invest in a podcast, he stated: 

“I think we will be feature complete — full self-driving — this year. Meaning the car will be able to find you in a parking lot, pick you up and take you all the way to your destination without an intervention, this year.”

Musk added that you can expect to be able to take a nap behind the wheel if you want.

“My guess as to when we would think it is safe for somebody to essentially fall asleep and wake up at their destination? Probably towards the end of next year.”

Such technology would be a first-of-its-kind level 5 autonomous vehicle in which the car capable of handling all driver functions without human assistance or supervision.

Musk acknowledges that it is a difficult task. Currently, Tesla offers an Enhanced Autopilot feature that “guides a car from a highway’s on-ramp to off-ramp, including suggesting and making lane changes, navigating highway interchanges, and taking exits.”

“On a development level, [there is] no problem recognizing stop signs and traffic lights,” Musk has said. “But you do get ambiguity in some complex intersections with traffic lights. Like, which one’s the right light to focus on? Even if you’re a person, it’s not always clear. So that’s what we’re working on there.”

Technology experts and economists, citing multiple studies, suggest self-driving cars, or automated vehicles (AVs), will have massive beneficial effects on cities and human society.

AVs will free up an additional 50 minutes a day for human users, accumulating to an extra billion hours of productivity around the world. Perhaps even more importantly, AVs will dramatically reduce car accident fatalities (by up to 90% of the annual 1.2 million worldwide deaths), which will also save $190 billion in the U.S. alone.

AVs will also transform cities, leading to an 80% reduction in the overall number of vehicles, which will drastically reduce traffic congestion, free up new land, and lead to an overall reduction of pollution.

Tesla is currently in an AV race with other companies developing self-driving cars, including Waymo, Uber, Lyft, and traditional automakers. In 2018, Alphabet’s Waymo launched its robo-taxi service, though it was not fully autonomous.

AVs are expected to simultaneously usher in a new gold rush of consumer robotics and machine learning, including remote advanced sensing, hyperprecise positioning/GPS, image recognition, and advanced artificial intelligence (AI) development.

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Man Designs An Off-Road “Wheelchair” So That His Wife Can Go Places She Never Imagined

In hopes of getting his wife to see more, Zack Nelson created a hybrid wheel chair so she could go places she could not before.

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Photo Credit: Zacks Jerryrig

In the USA alone, there are around 2.7 million people who are bound to a wheelchair. Most of us take our abled bodies for granted at times. We don’t think twice when we climb stairs, or go for a walk in nature.

Meet Cambry, for almost all her adult life she has been wheelchair bound, unable to get around like her able-bodied friends, she’s been restricted to the pavement.

In hopes of getting Cambry to see more and be less restricted, her boyfriend at the time, Zack Nelson, created a hybrid wheel chair so she could go places she could not before. He merged two electric bikes and put a seat in the center. The best part was, it worked, and Cambry was able to experience a new found freedom thanks to the awesome creation Zack made for her.

The new spliced bike creation allowed Cambry to tackle obstacles that would normally be impossible in a regular wheelchair, and she could go on for miles without her shoulders hurting from pushing herself along.

It’s a year later now, and Cambry and Zack are not only married, but they have begun mass producing the “Not-a-Wheelchair” – the amazing off road vehicle has taken a year to perfect.

Choosing an adaptive off roader for disabled people doesn’t leave you with many options, the couple have said. They can cost as much as a regular car or are just insanely slow. Zack and Cambry came up with their design which is light and quick and comes with a long range, but it was not all easy and smooth sailing. Cambry explained:

“The toughest challenge when developing ‘Not-A-Wheelchair’ is the price. We wanted to create something that is affordable for everyone. Finding quality components, and a simple enough design at the cheapest price possible took quite a bit of time. But I think we have something now that everyone will be able to enjoy, at a fraction of the cost of other ‘off-road wheelchairs’ currently on the market.”

‘Not-a-Wheelchair’ is definitely not an indoor machine, so Cambry still uses her normal wheelchair for inside their home but any time she and Zack go to the park, or on a hike, she jumps in The Rig. “It’s silent, which means that we can all still talk and chat while she rides next to the group,” her husband explained.

During these trips, ‘Not-a-Wheelchair’ really showed what it’s capable of. “We have taken The Rig to Hawaii twice for testing. The bike has to be shipped with a freight company before we go, but we ship The Rig about a week before we fly out ourselves, and it’s waiting there for us when we arrive. All this travel was before COVID was a thing. Luckily, we also live near mountains and snow with long wide flat trails to try the bike out on.”

More info: notawheelchair.com | YouTube

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