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8 Ways You Can Help Your Teen Avoid Substance Abuse Problems

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8 Ways You Can Help Your Teen Avoid Substance Abuse Problems
Photo Credit: www.medium.com

Nikki HarperGuest Writer

Substance addiction, whether it’s to drugs or alcohol, ruins lives – and the earlier it begins, the greater the chances of what begins as dabbling or experimenting becoming a harmful addiction. The latest statistics show that 21% of high school students in the USA have sold, been offered or been given drugs, on school property, in the year to December 2019. The good news is that overall, drug use among high schoolers appears to be falling slightly, but any parent will be familiar with the concern over how to potentially handle a teen’s interest in drugs.

In truth, of course, any teen can develop a substance abuse problem – from any kind of background, any kind of home, any part of the world. Parents are not to blame for the choices their teens make, but there are several ways you can adjust your parenting to help make it less likely that your teen will prove vulnerable to addiction. .

1 – Address Your Child’s Mental Health Problems

Statistics show that a high proportion of teenagers have a mental health condition of one kind of or another, ranging from depression and anxiety to ADHD or eating disorders. It’s a tough world for teenagers out there right now, and as their brains grow and develop, it’s not surprising that mental health problems can crop up. A big mistake parents make, however, is not seeking help for their teen’s mental health, just assuming that the child will grow out of it. They might, or they might not, but pre-existing mental health problems are a big risk factor in addiction.

2 – Be Honest About Your Own Drug Use

The conversation may be awkward, but the worst thing you can do is to lie. If you took drugs or drank too much in your youth, tell the truth if your teen challenges you on this. Explain why you regret the choices you made, and why with hindsight you would not want them to make the same mistakes. Equally, if you do not regret your choices, but you understand that you were lucky to have not developed an addiction, explain that too. There is no evidence to show that admitting to your own past mistakes will make your child any more likely to experiment; in fact, it will probably make it less likely, as you will have de-glamorized the appeal. Who wants to do what Mom or Dad did?

3 – Don’t Be Too Strict or Judgemental

It can be difficult to maintain an open, honest, loving relationship with a difficult teen, but your goal should be to parent so that your child feels able and willing to come to you at any time when they are in difficulty. If they think you’re going to over-react, lay down the law or turn psycho on them, guess what? They’re going to hide the problem until it’s too late.

4 – Notice Changes in Your Teen’s Behavior

You know your teen best, and you’re in the best position to spot behavioural changes. If your child suddenly loses interest in their school work, or switches their set of friends, or becomes more sociable, or less, or more hyperactive, or more sleepy – note the change, and tactfully ask about it. Often these behavioural changes are nothing to worry about and not related to addiction – but they could be.

5 – Don’t Think Your Teen is Too Intelligent to Take Drugs

If your teen is a good student and an all-round good kid, it’s tempting to think that your job is done, and that they’ve got the wisdom, intelligence and maturity to avoid drugs and alcohol. Not so. The prefrontal cortex – the part of the brain responsible for judgement decisions – is not fully mature until the early to mid-twenties. Your good kid can still make bad calls.

6 – Set Boundaries and Expectations

If you’re more of a friend to your teen than a parent, then they don’t know where the boundaries and limits are. Drugs and alcohol should have been discussed, and they should know your rules and your stance on this issue – but equally importantly, they should understand the boundaries and expectations in other area of life, such as school work, friends, staying out late, swearing and anything else which matters in your home. Knowing these expectations and limits across the board will help to keep your teen on the rails.

7 – Don’t Think Experimentation is Not An Issue

It’s true that a high proportion of teens do experiment with alcohol and/or drugs at some point, and it’s also true that for the huge majority, this does no harm; most teens do not go on to become addicts. However, addiction isn’t the only problem which can arise from drugs and alcohol – think car accidents, for example, or law breaking. Help your teens understand how to say no and mean no, so that they can stay away from experimentation which could end messily. It will also help to empower them to stand their ground in other situations.

8 – If the Worst Happens – Get Help Immediately

If the worst happens and you discover that your teen does have a drug or alcohol problem, do not put off getting help. You may think that you can deal with it at home, or that it’s not so serious and won’t get any worse – wrong. Early intervention is a key factor in successfully resolving teen substance abuse problems, so seek professional help at the earliest possible opportunity.

Recommended Articles by Nikki Harper
About the Author

Nikki Harper is a spiritualist writer, astrologer, and Wake Up World’s editor.

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Awareness

How To Create A Healthy Non-Toxic Bedroom

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How To Create A Healthy Non-Toxic Bedroom
Photo Credit: Pexels

Elisha McFarlandGuest Writer

Many of us understand the importance of consuming organic foods and making detoxification a regular part of our health routine. Creating a healthy home environment is also part of the detoxification/clean living process. After learning about the health hazards of dryer sheets and toxic cleaning products, you may have already eliminated these products from your home. But what about your bedroom? After all we do spend one third of our lives sleeping, yet often times this is the room that is neglected.

Creating a clean (non-toxic) bedroom can be a financial challenge, so starting small is the easiest solution. Every change you can make will have a positive impact on your health. How you begin is a personal decision based on your budget and health issues. Some people begin with replacing their mattress, others an air cleaner or bedding.

Creating A Healthy Bedroom
1. Replace Your Bedding with Organic Materials

Replace or remove all artificial fabrics from your bedding. Start with pillows and pillow cases, gradually working your way through the sheets, mattress and bed frame (if it’s made from artificial products such as particle board or MDF, see suggestion #5 below). Many people make the mistake of assuming that cotton is a safer choice than synthetics, but the fact is that cotton uses 25% of the world’s insecticides and over 14% of its pesticides.  As you can afford it, replace your bedding with organic materials.

2. Replace or Remove Artificial Clothes in Your Closet

The reality is that synthetic materials such as acrylic, nylon, and polyester are made from thermoplastics. These fabrics out gas plastic molecules whenever they are heated. [1] If you wear wrinkle free clothes you’re breathing in plastic and formaldehyde. Remember that you also absorb these chemicals directly through your skin.

The base for most synthetic fabrics is a liquid made from coal, oil, or natural gas. [3] The liquid is forced through the fine holes of a nozzle, called a spinneret. As the liquid emerges from the holes, it is cooled so that it solidifies to form tiny threads. These threads are woven together to make fabric.  To make these clothes more durable Perfluorochemicals (PFCs), including Teflon is added to fabric to offer wrinkle and stain resistant qualities.  Look for clothing made of natural or organic materials. To learn more about synthetic clothes click here.

3. Remove Faux-Fabric Furniture

If you have any furniture in your bedroom, such as a chair that is artificial leather, it shouldn’t be in your bedroom or any room in your house for that matter. You may be surprised to learn that Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), is often used in synthetic leather. PVC is widely regarded as the most dangerous of all plastics. It is made more flexible with the use of toxic plasticizers—typically phthalates, which are known endocrine disruptors. Throw pillows and seating cushions that are stain and water resistant have been sprayed with chemicals that are toxic. If the fabric is a cotton/polyester blend it was most likely treated with formaldehyde, and softened with ammonia. [2] Replace these when you can with organic or natural material.

4. Remove Particle Board and MDF

If you have any furniture that is made of particle board, MDF or melamine, it shouldn’t be in your house, especially your bedroom. MDF is made with shredded wood that has been softened and powdered. The powder is combined with resins and other bonding agents and compacted into solid boards. The chemical that causes the most concern is formaldehyde, which can aggravate asthma and other lung conditions, irritate mucous membranes, and cause contact dermatitis. [5]

Like MDF, particle board contains formaldehyde, a known carcinogen that has been directly linked to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (throat cancer) in people. The chemical can also cause headaches, allergies, nausea and a burning sensation in the throat.

According to TLC, How Stuff Works, within two months, particle board decreases its toxicity by about 25%. By the end of the first year, particle board is only half as potent as it was new. It levels off from there and can take up to ten years to run completely out gas. [5]

Look for solid wood furniture at furniture stores, flea markets and yard sales. Glass and metal end tables and desks generally work well as they don’t outgas and are easily wiped down.

5. Remove Accent / Throw Rugs

Wood or tile floors are easiest to clean and better options for allergy/asthma and MCS sufferers. While small accent or area rugs may look nice in your bedroom, they hold onto dirt, dust mites and other allergens. If you can, omit rugs and carpet. Almost all polyester is manufactured with antimony, a carcinogen that is toxic to the heart, lungs, liver, and skin. [4] Many carpets are also made of olefin (polypropylene). Nylon, which is petroleum based synthetic fibre invented in the 1930’s by Dupont and is common in rugs.

6. Use ‘No VOC’ Paint

If you decide to paint a room use No VOC (volatile organic compounds) paint. VOCs are unstable, carbon-containing compounds that easily vaporize into the air. When they enter the air, they react with other elements to produce ozone, which causes air pollution and a host of health issues including breathing problems, headache, burning, watery eyes and nausea. [6]

7. Shoe Free Zone

Consider making your home a shoe free zone. Have indoor and outdoor shoes to avoid tracking in pollen, dirt and chemicals from outdoors in. You can also purchase a shoe or boot tray to keep by your door. When you come in from outdoors simply place your shoes in the tray to minimize dirt, pollen, dust and chemicals from being tracked into your house.

8. Minimize Electrical Devices

If you have a computer, TV or other electronic devices in your bedroom, you may consider moving them into another room. Electronic devices emit radiation that can disturb a peaceful night of sleep by disrupting sleep patterns. Switch out your digital alarm clock to a battery operated alarm clock.

9. Replace or Cover Your Mattress

This is the most difficult step as it is cost prohibitive for many people. The reality is that conventional mattresses are sprayed with flame retardant and stain resistant chemicals. Many mattresses are made of foam that can outgas for years. There are many sources for organic mattresses at local stores and online. Wherever you shop be aware of green washing. If you can’t afford to replace your mattress, you may consider wrapping it in a foil barrier cloth available at www.afs-foil.com. They also sell a foil tape to seal the edges. I found the tape to have a strong smell, although it does evaporate in 3-4 days.  If you are chemically sensitive, have someone else do this for you.

10. Buy an Air Cleaner

If you can afford a whole house air cleaner, they are a wonderful investment. Do your research; there are a lot to choose from. For many people a portable air cleaner that can be moved from room to room is a wonderful option. Look for one with HEPA filtration, and be sure that whatever you buy does not produce ozone. Some air cleaning companies will even custom blend their charcoal filters for specific need such as allergy/asthma, smoke, MCS etc.

Recommended Air Cleaner, If You’re Interested…
11. Remove Chemically Treated Drapes or Shades

Drapes and shades hide dust, pollen, and other allergens. If you can remove drapes and shades and replace them with organic fabric drapes and shades. If the cost is prohibitive, consider bartering with a friend who can sew curtains or drapes for you. Wood blinds may also be an option for some individuals. If you are building a new home or remodelling you may consider blinds that are in between the glass, no out gassing, and no weekly cleaning!

References
  1. Home Safe Home by Debra Lynn Dadd
  2. Gretel H. Schueller,”From Hippie to Hip,” Audubon Magazine, http://archive.audubonmagazine.org/audubonliving/audubonliving0911.html
  3. William McDonough, Michael Braungart, “Transforming the Textile Industry: Victor Innovatex, Eco-Intelligent Polyester and the Next Industrial Revolution,” green@work, May-June 2002.
  4. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-health-risks-of-mdf.htm
  5. http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/particle-board-safety.htm
  6. http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/construction/materials/low-voc-paint.htm
Recommended Articles by Elisha
About the Author

Elisha McFarland N.D., D. A. Hom., CWR., M.H. is the founder of My Health Maven. Elisha turned her debilitating illness from mercury poisoning into a dedicated passion to helping others. The My Health Maven website covers a wide range of topics including non-toxic living, health tests at home, the healing power of foods, home remedies, food ingredients, dental health and environmental illness. Her goal is to share her experience and knowledge, to help others live life more abundantly.

Elisha’s articles are widely published throughout alternative media such as The Organic Consumer’s Association and Food Matters TV. She is also a contributor to GreenMedInfo, Natural Health 365, Natural News, The Hearty Soul and Eat Local Grown.

You can connect with Elisha at:

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Awareness

Amalgam Fillings Release Mercury Vapor Into Your Body 24/7

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Image Credit: http://www.goldensmilesdental.com/

Elisha McFarland, Guest Writer

Research at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine and other prominent medical schools, have demonstrated that mercury vapour continuously escapes from dental amalgams and 80% of this vapour is immediately absorbed through the lungs and into the bloodstream. Once in the blood, mercury vapour enters into the cells almost immediately.

Mercury vapour from dental amalgam fillings is the primary source of mercury contamination. 80% of adults, specifically baby boomers, currently have amalgam fillings that will release from 4 to 40 micrograms of mercury vapour per day, depending on factors such as the number of fillings, filling size, teeth grinding and the presence of other metals in the mouth.

Every day, we do things to encourage the release of mercury vapour from amalgam fillings: chewing gum, eating, drinking hot tea or coffee, having dental work done and getting your teeth cleaned. Effects of exposure can vary significantly depending on the tissues and/or organs involved as well as other genetic and health factors.

According to Dr. Russell Blaylock, mercury can damage many bodily systems, although the nervous, immune and cardiovascular systems seem to suffer the most adverse effects of chronic exposure. He also states that there is growing evidence that mercury toxicity plays a vital role in a significant number of Alzheimer’s cases along with other neurodegenerative diseases.

Protecting yourself from mercury exposure

An article published in the British Dental Journal (2001) stated that in 15-20% of dental offices, the mercury vapour concentration levels were 10 times higher than the current safety limit set by OSHA.

When you visit a traditional dentist, you increase your risk of mercury exposure from someone else’s procedure, since even a simple dental cleaning will release mercury vapour into your dentist’s office. So if you are not ready to replace your amalgam fillings, you should consider finding a biological dentist in your area to reduce your mercury exposure during   your dental visits.

Safe amalgam extraction

If you have any amalgam fillings, get them replaced. Your dentist should be following a safe protocol as outlined by The International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology:

  1. Use of a rubber dam to prevent any amalgam debris from being swallowed or inhaled.
  2. Covering the face of the patient with a barrier to prevent spattered amalgam particles and mercury vapour from coming in contact with the skin and eyes.
  3. Administration of nasal oxygen.
  4. Use of high volume suction in the operating area.
  5. Use of a saliva ejector behind the dam to evacuate any mercury vapor that passes through the dam.
  6. Rinsing of the dam thoroughly during amalgam removal to remove any stray amalgam particles.
  7. Using water on amalgam during removal to cool the amalgam and reduce the amount of vaporization of mercury.
  8. Sectioning the amalgam fillings into large chunks for removal in order of reducing the disbursement of amalgam particulate aerosol.
  9. Thorough rinsing of the mouth area after removing rubber dam.
  10. Proper office and air filtration system in dental office.

If you have chemical or environmental sensitivity and are removing amalgam fillings, work with a nutritionist or naturopath to come up with a health plan based on your specific needs, to avoid any negative reactions.

Sources for this article include:
Recommended Articles by Elisha
About the Author

Elisha McFarland N.D., D. A. Hom., CWR., M.H. is the founder of My Health Maven. Elisha turned her debilitating illness from mercury poisoning into a dedicated passion to helping others. The My Health Maven website covers a wide range of topics including non-toxic living, health tests at home, the healing power of foods, home remedies, food ingredients, dental health and environmental illness. Her goal is to share her experience and knowledge, to help others live life more abundantly.

Elisha’s articles are widely published throughout alternative media such as The Organic Consumer’s Association and Food Matters TV. She is also a contributor to GreenMedInfo, Natural Health 365, Natural News, The Hearty Soul and Eat Local Grown.

You can connect with Elisha at:

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Awareness

Eight Ingredients You Never Want To See On Your Nutrition Label

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Eight Ingredients You Never Want To See On Your Nutrition Label
Photo Credit: https://medium.com/@maybe_daisy

By David Zinczenko & Matt Goulding

The year was 1950, and The Magic 8-Ball had just arrived in stores. It looked like a toy, but it wasn’t. It was a future-telling device, powered by the unknown superpowers that lived inside its cheap plastic shell. Despite a bit of an attitude —”Don’t count on it,” “My reply is no”— it was a huge success. Americans, apparently, want to see their futures.

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labelling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I’m trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren’t as clear and direct as The Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you’ve never heard of. But the truth is, you don’t have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you’ll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up — whether you’ll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

While researching the new Eat This, Not That! 2013: The No-Diet Weight Loss Solution, I identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

1. BHA

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn’t banned it is largely technical — the cancers all occurred in the rodents’ forestomachs, an organ that humans don’t have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was “reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen,” and as far as I’m concerned, that’s reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

2. Parabens

These synthetic preservatives are used to inhibit mold and yeast in food. The problem is parabens may also disrupt your body’s hormonal balance. A study in Food Chemical Toxicology found that daily ingestion decreased sperm and testosterone production in rats, and parabens have been found present in breast cancer tissues.

3. Partially Hydrogenated Oil

I’ve harped on this before, but it bears repeating: Don’t confuse “0 g trans-fat” with being trans-fat-free. The FDA allows products to claim zero grams of trans fat as long as they have less than half a gram per serving. That means they can have 0.49 grams per serving and still be labelled a no-trans-fat food. Considering that two grams is the absolute most you ought to consume in a day, those fractions can quickly add up. The telltale sign that your snack is soiled with the stuff? Look for partially hydrogenated oil on the ingredient statement. If it’s anywhere on there, then you’re ingesting artery-clogging trans-fat.

FIGHT FAT WITH FAT! Some fats, like trans-fat, will pad you with extra pounds, but other types can help you shed unwanted weight. See for yourself — pick up these 5 Fatty Foods that Make You Skinny  today!

4. Sodium Nitrite

Nitrites and nitrates are used to inhibit botulism-causing bacteria and to maintain processed meats’ pink hues, which is why the FDA allows their use. Unfortunately, once ingested, nitrite can fuse with amino acids (of which meat is a prime source) to form nitrosamines, powerful carcinogenic compounds. Ascorbic and erythorbic acids — essentially vitamin C — have been shown to decrease the risk, and most manufacturers now add one or both to their products, which has helped. Still, the best way to reduce risk is to limit your intake.

5. Caramel Colouring

This additive wouldn’t be dangerous if you made it the old-fashioned way — with water and sugar, on top of a stove. But the food industry follows a different recipe: They treat sugar with ammonia, which can produce some nasty carcinogens. How carcinogenic are these compounds? A Center for Science in the Public Interest report asserted that the high levels of caramel color found in soda account for roughly 15,000 cancers in the U.S. annually. Another good reason to scrap soft drinks? They’re among The 20 Worst Drinks in America.

6. Castoreum

Castoreum is one of the many nebulous “natural ingredients” used to flavour food. Though it isn’t harmful, it is unsettling. Castoreum is a substance made from beavers’ castor sacs, or anal scent glands. These glands produce potent secretions that help the animals mark their territory in the wild. In the food industry, however, 1,000 pounds of the unsavoury ingredient are used annually to imbue foods — usually vanilla or raspberry flavoured — with a distinctive, musky flavour.

7. Food Dyes

Plenty of fruit-flavoured candies and sugary cereals don’t contain a single gram of produce, but instead rely on artificial dyes and flavourings to suggest a relationship with nature. Not only do these dyes allow manufacturers to mask the drab colours of heavily processed foods, but certain hues have been linked to more serious ailments. A  Journal of Pediatrics study linked Yellow 5 to hyperactivity in children, Canadian researchers found Yellow 6 and Red 40 to be contaminated with known carcinogens, and Red 3 is known to cause tumors. The bottom line? Avoid artificial dyes as much as possible.

THE DOMINO EFFECT: Sugar doesn’t just come in the form of cookies and candy. Discover the insidious ways it can creep into your diet with 9 Sneaky Sources of Sugar.

8. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein

Hydrolyzed vegetable protein, used as a flavour enhancer, is plant protein that has been chemically broken down into amino acids. One of these acids, glutamic acid, can release free glutamate. When this glutamate joins with free sodium in your body, they form monosodium glutamate (MSG), an additive known to cause adverse reactions—headaches, nausea, and weakness, among others — in sensitive individuals. When MSG is added to products directly, the FDA requires manufacturers to disclose its inclusion on the ingredient statement. But when it occurs as a byproduct of hydrolyzed protein, the FDA allows it to go unrecognized.

Source: Mens Health

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What Alcohol Consumption Does To Your Brain

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Photo Credit: https://www.americasrehabcampuses.com/

Alcohol is a large part of our society. We drink it when we go out to brunch, lunch, and dinner, when we have guests over, we go out for drinks to catch up with old friends or for a first date, and cheers each other enthusiastically to celebrate birthdays, weddings, graduations, and the like.

Whether you’re having one or two casual drinks or you’ve tallied up enough drinks to have you dancing and singing on top of the bar, it can’t be denied that even just a small amount of alcohol affects our brains and our behaviours.

The Science of the Effect of Alcohol on the Brain

Alcohol is classified as a depressant, as opposed to a stimulant like the caffeine in coffee and tea. Despite this classification, when people drink, they tend to have a spark of energy, and feel excitement, elation, and that well-known alcohol “buzz”. Why is it that something that technically is supposed to make you sleepy instead make you able to drop it like it’s hot on the dance floor? (1)

Alcohol is considered a depressant because it targets the chemical GABA, which is the primary neurotransmitter in your brain. When this is affected, it alters our mood, behavior, arousal, and neuropsychological functioning. (1)

How Alcohol acts as a Stimulant

Everyone’s favourite form of “liquid courage” is more than just a depressant, however. When you are drinking, as your blood alcohol content rises, it acts as more of a stimulant. Several changes happen in your brain as you drink:

  • Levels of Norepinephrine increase (the chemical responsible for excitement and impulsive behavior) (1)
  • Activity decreases in the prefrontal cortex of your brain, the region responsible for rational thought, decision making, and violence (1)
  • Activity decreases in the temporal cortex, the region that houses the hippocampus. The hippocampus is responsible for forming new memories, so a decrease in activity here explains “blackouts” and the inability to recollect events from your night out. (1)
  • Activity decreases in the cerebellum, the region responsible for motor control. (1)

All of this explains why people tend to be “braver” while drinking, agree to things they normally wouldn’t (“of course I’ll sing that Adele song for karaoke!”), are more likely to hurt themselves (“no seriously guys, I can break dance. Just watch!”), and forget portions or even entire evenings out on the town. (1)

How Alcohol acts as a Depressant

When you stop drinking your blood alcohol content begins to fall and has a sedative effect on your brain. This is why people tend to get sleepy after a glass or two of wine or “pass out” quickly at the end of a night of drinking. (1)

The Spiritual Effect of Alcohol

Some studies suggest that alcohol affects those who are spiritual themselves differently than others. Researchers at the University of Kentucky found that the more religious someone is, the more likely they are to become aggressive when drinking. (3) In contrast, a study from the Journal of Studies on Alcohol found that spirituality, prayer, and meditation was of great benefit for those recovering from alcoholism. (4)

Psychology Today wrote an article about the spirituality of children, and how over time we tend to lose that spirituality as we grow and become adults. One of the contributing factors of this are drugs and alcohol, and the peer pressure to join in and use these substances.

Drinking is often used to fill the spiritual void that develops over time and causes adults to focus on “costly, destructive, short-term goals” rather than the more long-term journey of finding happiness and purpose within themselves. (5)

The Bottom Line

Regardless of whether you approach drunkenness from a scientific or a spiritual background, one thing we can all agree on is that drinking, especially when you have one or two more than perhaps you should, changes how you think, act, and affects your ability to refrain from texting your ex-boyfriend or walk down a set of stairs without falling over.

Like it or not, social drinking is a large part of our society. Please always remember to drink within your limits, never drink and drive, and for heaven’s sake don’t post anything on social media until you are back to your sober, rational self!

Sources
  1. Gowin, J. (2010, June 18). Your Brain on Alcohol. Retrieved August 09, 2017, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/you-illuminated/201006/your-brain-alcohol
  2. Change, E. I. (2017, June 21). The Spiritual Consequences of Alcohol Consumption. Retrieved August 09, 2017, from http://educateinspirechange.org/health/spiritual-consequences-alcohol-consumption/
  3. Psychology. (n.d.). Retrieved August 09, 2017, from https://psychology.as.uky.edu/can-alcohol-release-beast-within-spiritual-people
  4. Carroll, S. (1993, May). Spirituality and purpose in life in alcoholism recovery. Retrieved August 09, 2017, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8487537
  5. Culliford, L. (2011, July 13). Sex, Drugs & Education: The Spiritual Perspective. Retrieved August 09, 2017, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/spiritual-wisdom-secular-times/201107/sex-drugs-education-the-spiritual-perspective

This article (What Alcohol Consumption Does to Your Brain) was originally created for The Hearthy Soul and is published here under Creative Commons.

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